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Jon Kownacki Explains His New Abstract Project, “Traversing Timber”

August 3, 2017

By Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

© Jon Kownacki

I started my project “Traversing Timber” as a passenger on a day trip through the Cherokee National Forest. It’s an abstraction process of linking foreground, middle ground and background objects through overlap and motion—creating an image in-camera of all the combined or obscured elements.

Distant objects appear to move at a different speed than closer ones. Converging objects create new patterns and shapes. The images developed by this technique are a combination/ratio of speed between separated layers—they depict the way that the branches and trunks web together with the motion of the wind or motion of the camera. Photography has a unique ability to capture a moment in a way that can extend or compress motion, and my intention has been to isolate moving things in a way that may be missed just by a casual observation of nature.

I’ve applied this approach to my commercial work in the form of editorial details, and textural macro images. Something my clients seem to really love. I try to find subjects that help tell the concept’s story with a bit more depth and emotion. It’s something that’s helped me grow my signature style and approach to projects, and keep my jobs fun and inspiring.

Tech notes:
Duration: November 1996 to present (ongoing)
Locations: Asheville-Waynesville, NC. Atlanta-Avondale Estates, GA. Kingston, NY

Camera: Hasselblad 500c, 80mm C

Film: Kodak Tri-X 320, Ilford Delta 3200
Chemical: D76 1:1
Digital: Scanned into Photoshop for dust removal, white and black point settings only
Prints: Archival Inkjet at 14 x 14-inch or 36- x36-inch

See more of Jon’s work at www.jonkownacki.com


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